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Nutrition and intestinal microbiota - host interaction in the pig: Influence of nutritional factors on the prevalence of viruses, including viruses with zoonotic potential, in faeces of clinically healthy pigs (SFB 852)

01/2012-12/2014

This third-party funded project is conducted in the framework of the BfR research program for exposition estimation and assessment of biological risks.

Project number of Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG): SFB 852/1 2010

Homepage of the project: www.sfb852.de/en/index.html

The Collaborative Research Center „Nutrition and intestinal microbiota – host interaction in the pig“ investigates the interactions between nutritional factors, the intestinal flora and the host organism, and the resulting consequences for pig health. One partial aspect focuses on zoonotic agents in the gut of pigs, which can be transmitted to humans.

Projects at the BfR

Project A2, which is hosted at the BfR, investigates the influence of nutritional factors on the prevalence of viruses, including viruses with zoonotic potential, in faeces of clinically healthy pigs.

The hypothesis is that zinc or Enterococcus faecium can change the composition of the porcine viral gut flora. Therefore, the project determines (i) the composition of the viral gut flora before and after supplementation with the nutritional factors and (ii) the prevalence of zoonotic viruses in faeces of pigs. Novel “high-throughput sequencing” techniques are applied to preparations of purified virus particles. Hepatitis E virus, encephalomyocarditis virus, astro-, noro- and sapoviruses are monitored due to their zoonotic potential. 

Project A7, which is hosted at the BfR, performs challenge studies on the effect of zinc supplementation and a probiotic (Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415) on the colonization and shedding of Salmonella Typhimurium in weaning pigs.

A significant higher faecal excretion and organ colonization and a stronger humoral immune response ocurred in piglets fed with E. faecium NCIMB 10415 after challenge with S. Typhimurium. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of zinc oxide and E. faecium NCIMB 10415 on the clinical course, immune response, shedding behaviour and gastrointestinal colonisation in weaning pigs challenged with S. Typhimurium. Local and systemic reactions are investigated to better understand regulatory mechanisms which are important for the cellular and humoral immune response in pigs after exposure to pathogens.

Project partners:

  • Free University Berlin (coordinator)
  • German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department Biological Safety
  • Humboldt-University Berlin
  • Technical University Berlin
  • German Institute for Human Nutrition, Potsdam Rehbrücke
  • Charité

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External Links

 (1)
Link
Collaborative Research Group (SFB) 852 "Nutrition and intestinal microbiota - host interactions in the pig"

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